Whitby Abbey has been inspiring visitors for nearly 1500 years – now it’s your turn. [4][5] He appointed Lady Hilda, abbess of Hartlepool Abbey and grand-niece of Edwin, the first Christian king of Northumbria, as founding abbess. The double monastery of Celtic monks and nuns was home (614–680) to the great Northumbrian poet Cædmon.[7].

The name Streoneshalh is thought to signify Fort Bay or Tower Bay, in reference to a supposed Roman settlement that previously existed on the site. For generations its strange haunting beauty, especially at sunset or in a full moon, has sent shivers down the spine of impressionable visitors. Whitby Abbey Whitby Abbey.

This contention has never been proven and alternative theories have been proposed, such as the name meaning Streona's settlement. This year, there's more to see at Whitby Abbey than ever before. This half term, we have teamed up with North Yorkshire Moors Railway and Pickering Castle to give you a chance to win a full day out visiting all three venues.

We have introduced limits on visitor numbers to help keep everyone safe, and you won’t be able to visit without your booking confirmation. In 2019 we invested almost £1.6 million to transform Whitby Abbey and celebrate the history of this iconic landmark.

[1] The abbey church was situated overlooking the North Sea on the East Cliff above Whitby in North Yorkshire, England, a centre of the medieval Northumbrian kingdom. Although things might be a little different when you visit, you’ll still be able to enjoy exploring the places where history really happened. The Abbey was bought by Sir Richard Cholmley. Follow in the footsteps of artists, writers and religious leaders to explore the soaring gothic ruins and to take in the stunning sea views. The abbey and its possessions were confiscated by the crown under Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries[2] between 1536 and 1545. Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula[17] featured Dracula as a creature as resembling a large dog which came ashore at the headland and climbed the 199 steps which lead up to the Whitby Abbey ruins. You can uncover centuries of history with the new interactive guide, and visit the revamped museum to find out more about how the abbey inspired Caedmon, the first named English poet, and Bram Stoker, the author of 'Dracula'. Whitby Abbey was a 7th-century Christian monastery that later became a Benedictine abbey. In Old Norse, this name means a habitation of priests.

Since that time, the ruins of the abbey have continued to be used by sailors as a landmark at the headland. He approached William de Percy for a grant of land, who gave him the ruined monastery of St. Peter with two carucates of land, to found a new monastery. Landscape photo of Whitby Abbey in North Yorkshire, with a small pond in the foreground. This year, there's more to see at Whitby Abbey than ever before. This second monastery was destroyed by Henry VIII in 1540 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The name Streoneshalh is thought to signify Fort Bay or Tower Bay in reference to a supposed Roman settlement or Roman Signal Station that previously existed on the site. Some believe that the name referred to Eadric Streona,[6] but this is highly unlikely for chronological reasons. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Plus our award winning Members’ Magazine delivered four times a year. The ruins are now owned and maintained by English Heritage. To improve security and online experience, please use a different browser or, Abbey Lane, Whitby, North Yorkshire, YO22 4JT, https://www.youtube.com/user/EnglishHeritageFilm.

The name Streoneshalh is thought to signify Fort Bay or Tower Bay in reference to a supposed Roman settlement or Roman Signal … The abbey church was situated overlooking the North Sea on the East Cliff above Whitby in North Yorkshire, England, a centre of the medieval Northumbrian kingdom.

The first monastery was founded in 657 AD by the Anglo-Saxon era King of Northumbria, Oswy (Oswiu) as Streoneshalh (the older name for Whitby). Whitby Abbey has been inspiring visitors for nearly 1500 years – now it’s your turn. It remained in Cholmley family and their descendants, the Strickland family.

Explore 3,000 years of history in the new permanent exhibition with dramatic displays of unique objects and an interactive guide. The decision, with the support of King Oswy, was for adopting Roman practices and the date of Easter was set. "Abbey of Whitby." The entrance to the abbey is fully accessible, and you’ll find improved facilities in the visitor centre, including a bigger shop. The Benedictine abbey was thriving for centuries, a centre of learning. This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Herbermann, Charles, ed.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. There are two ways to get there - by car and a road south of Whitby takes you to a council run carpark near to the abbey entrance (English Heritage - currently requiring pre-booked timed tickets via their website); or park in

The second monastery lasted until it was destroyed by Henry VIII in 1540.

A locality named 'Prestebi' was recorded in the Domesday Survey, which may be a sign that religious life was revived in some form after the Danish raids. We have introduced limits on visitor numbers to help keep everyone safe, and you won’t be able to visit without your booking confirmation. He was succeeded as prior by Serlo de Percy.[9].

Coordinates: 54°29′20″N 0°36′29″W / 54.489°N 0.608°W / 54.489; -0.608, Abbey in Whitby, North Yorkshire, England, Huddleston, Gilbert. To book your visit, click the button below. Streona died in 1017 so the naming of Streoneshalh would have preceded his birth by several hundred years. Whitby Abbey, or at least its skeletal remains, sits on a headland overlooking the North Sea and the pretty Yorkshire harbor town of Whitby. The double monastery of Benedictine monks and nuns was also home to the great Saxon poet Caedmon. In 664 the Synod of Whitby took place at the monastery to resolve the question of whether the Northumbrian church would adopt and follow Celtic Christian traditions or adopt Roman practice,[7] including the manner of calculating the date of Easter and form of the monastic tonsure. Entries must be made between 24 Oct - 1 Nov 2020 and the winner will be chosen on Friday 6 November. "Abbey of Whitby". There are other new steps in place to ensure everyone’s safety, so your visit will be a little different. The Strickland family passed it to the UK government in 1920[12]. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Follow in the footsteps of artists, writers and religious leaders to explore the soaring gothic ruins and to take in the stunning sea views.

In 867, Whitby Abbey fell to Viking attack, and was abandoned until 1078, when it was re-founded by Regenfrith (Reinferd) a soldier monk, under the orders of his protector, the Norman, William de Percy. Free entry for up to six children accompanied by an adult member (under 18 years and within the family group). Whitby Abbey was founded in 657 AD by the Saxon King of Northumbria, Oswy (Oswiu) as Streanshalh (Streonshalh). Whitby Abbey was a 7th-century Christian monastery that later became a Benedictine abbey. Whitby Abbey is a whole lot more than a spectacular looking cliff top landmark.

And you’ll still be given a warm and safe welcome by our friendly – if socially distant – staff and volunteers. [9] The greater part of de Percy's building was pulled down and the monastery was rebuilt on a larger scale in the 1220s.[10]. Please click here for more information about the safety measures you can expect when visiting as well as our FAQs. You will also be able to enjoy new improved facilities, making sure you get the most out of your visit. Complimentary full colour handbook worth £10.95. [9], The first prior, Reinfrid, ruled for many years before being killed in an accident. Catholic Encyclopedia. He was buried at St Peter's at Hackness, now in North Yorkshire. You are using an old version of Internet Explorer. To enter the competition, put on your fancy frightening dress, snap a picture while visiting one of the above places and tag either Whitby Abbey or North Yorkshire Moors Railway in your Facebook post. [9], Reinfrid, a soldier of William the Conqueror, became a monk and traveled to Streoneshalh, which was then known as Prestebi or Hwitebi (the "white settlement" in Old Norse).